Probably [there is bias], if one looks at the data about the number of women museum directors, pay scales and salaries, maternity leave. But it’s also interesting that many of the most exciting organizations that give New York City its extraordinary texture, that nurture generation after generation of emerging artists, and that contribute so significantly to making this city the inimitable cultural capital of the world, are run by women (as are several of the great enduring galleries). It says something about women’s visionary approach to shaping culture, their determination to make things happen in spite of the system or the conventions of institutions. Theirs is a kind of emancipation that is deeply felt, and which they act upon day after day. They ask no one’s permission to do what they do. Sexism doesn’t stand a chance.

RoseLee Goldberg, Founder, Performa
when asked, 
“Is the Art World Biased?” 

more here

infjconfessions
whitepeoplestealingculture:

humansofcolor:

nativefaces:

CULTURAL GENOCIDE:  Before and After photo of a young Cree boy, forced to attend a Canadian “Indian school.” (1910)

Despicable.

I want to show this to white people who say that cultural appropriation isn’t a big deal because you’re taking a part of someone’s culture that was insulted, attacked and taken away from them for years and years and now you want to wear it as some sort of costume or fashion trend. But your ancestors were the ones to forcefully take away and obliterate OUR cultures for centuries. We STILL aren’t allowed to freely embrace our cultures because white people love to insult us and make fun of us, but white people themselves love wearing it because they think their mayo asses are entitlted to everything. Nope fuck off. 

whitepeoplestealingculture:

humansofcolor:

nativefaces:

CULTURAL GENOCIDE:  Before and After photo of a young Cree boy, forced to attend a Canadian “Indian school.” (1910)

Despicable.

I want to show this to white people who say that cultural appropriation isn’t a big deal because you’re taking a part of someone’s culture that was insulted, attacked and taken away from them for years and years and now you want to wear it as some sort of costume or fashion trend. But your ancestors were the ones to forcefully take away and obliterate OUR cultures for centuries. We STILL aren’t allowed to freely embrace our cultures because white people love to insult us and make fun of us, but white people themselves love wearing it because they think their mayo asses are entitlted to everything. Nope fuck off. 

winonaforever
There have been some traumatic experiences in my life that have resulted in my feeling that maybe I was going insane for a little while. The question is — how do you define insanity? And how do you ever explain the feelings of anxiety and paralysing fear? I can’t answer those questions. It’s just a feeling of ‘Am I crazy? Am I too sensitive to be in this world?’ A feeling that the world is just too complicated for me right now, and I don’t feel like I belong here. But it passes, and fortunately today I feel blessed for all the good things in my life.

I’ve learned that it’s okay to be flawed, that life can be messy, that some days you glide and some days you fall, but most important, that there are no secret answers out there. When you finally accept that it’s okay not to have answers and it’s okay not to be perfect, you realize that feeling confused is a normal part of what it is to be a human being.
Winona Ryder, interview from 2000 (via xezene)
infjconfessions

Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.